Posted by: RealisticRecovery | March 1, 2009

“Higher Power” version of the Twelve Steps

He’s a version of the 12 Steps I really like. I just substituted the word “God” for the phrase “Higher Power”, very simple. It works on many levels, for those of us who are religious, the Higher Power could still represent God-Allah-Jesus-Etc; for those of us who are not religious but believe we are all spiritually connected in some way, the “Higher Power”could represent that connection, or collective soul; and for those of us who are “Realists”, the “Higher Power” phrase could represent Reality or Sanity , or our “Higher Self/True Inner Self”.

The truth is, Higher Power means whatever you personally understand it to mean.

I like this version, and wish the original 12-Steps were closer to this. -MH


“Higher Power” version of the Twelve Steps

1: We admitted we were powerless over our addiction/dysfunction/behavior–that our lives had become unmanageable.
2: Came to believe that a Higher Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
3: Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of that Higher Power as we understood it.
4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
5: Admitted to our Higher Power, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
6: Were entirely ready to have our Higher Power remove all these defects of character.
7: Humbly asked our Higher Power to remove our shortcomings.
8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
9: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
10: Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
11: Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with our Higher Power, as we understood it, praying only for knowledge of our Higher Power’s will for us and the power to carry that out.
12: Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to “those still suffering“, and to practice these principles in all areas of our lives.

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Responses

  1. Sometimes it’s a stretch, but this will work. I personally use “Truth.” “Reality” is good too.

  2. Hey GentlePath, thanks for visiting:

    I like “truth” too.
    I think “reality” and “truth” are one and the same.
    For me, once I started seeking reality instead of trying to run from it, I have actually experienced a powerful spiritual awakening, and my addictions are fading away.
    You can’t go wrong with “truth”, “honesty” and “reality”. They truly are higher powers.

    Mike H.

  3. What about this:

    1: We admitted we were powerless over our addiction–that our lives had become unmanageable.
    2: Came to believe that a twelve step fellowship was a power greater than ourselves that could restore us to sanity.
    3: Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the direction of a twelve step fellowship, and the fellowship’s principles as we understood them.
    4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
    5: Admitted to members of the fellowship, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
    6: Were entirely ready to have the fellowship and its principles remove all these defects of character.
    7: Humbly looked to the principles of the fellowship to remove our shortcomings.
    8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
    9: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
    10: Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
    11: Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with the fellowship’s guiding principles, as we understood them, praying only for knowledge of the fellowhip’s will for us and the power to carry that out.
    12: Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

  4. Hey Andrew, thanks for the input:

    It’s interesting to see the many variations of the the twelve steps that could potentially help people with their addictive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.
    Especially in this day and age when many people aren’t religious and the need to adopt a belief in a god in order to do the original 12-Steps can actually be a hurdle to recovery, as it was in mine.

    When I mentioned at 12-Step meetings that I was having a problem getting past Step 3 because I don’t believe in a god as my higher power, always someone mentioned that you can just make the group your higher power. I’ve never really been able to accept this or even wrap my head around that idea, especially concerning Steps 3 and 11.
    But for those who have made the group their higher power for the purpose of recovery, this is the 12-Steps for them.

    I think it could be a great exercise for all of us in recovery to write a version of the 12-Steps that best suits our situation and recovery.

    Keep coming back! LOL
    MH

  5. being a buddhist in recovery. i just say buddha. use what ever you need to. i dont have to rewrite anything today, like it says, “in the BB”. you can easily substiitute any word for the word alcohol, i m sure they wont mind if you substitute else for the word GOD, even with out having to make it your point your doing so.

  6. […] (steps 4 and 5) which I am very familiar with as Son is now 2 years into being clean and sober, says:  write it […]


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