Posted by: RealisticRecovery | February 16, 2009

The 12-Steps of Staying Addicted

You never know what you’re going to find out there. This is a real interesting take on the cause and self-perpetuation of addiction in the form of the 12-Steps of being addicted. I like it. Found on another cool wordpress blog: endigar.wordpress.com

The 12 Steps of Staying Addicted

1. I developed and maintained a willful blindness to my powerlessness over the drug of my choice, and became willing to deceive myself that I could manage the mess it produced in my life.

2. Came to argue that there is no power beyond myself, and listened to my own drug-induced insanity as the only trustworthy direction for my life.

3. Made a decision to turn my will and my life and everything I love over to the care of the drug of my choice.

4. Made a one-sided and fearful moral inventory of all those wrongs committed against me, and used it to justify my own short-comings.

5. I learned to stubbornly deny the existence of my wrongs to everyone and everything around me, but most especially to myself.

6. I accepted the help of my drug of choice to cherish my defects of character and learn to see them as personal strengths.

7. I asked my drug of choice to hide me from the humiliation of seeing the truth about my behavior.

8. I made a list of all the people who still trusted me and that might enable me to support my addiction, and became willing to use them.

9. I exploited and manipulated these people where possible, with no regard for how it might injure them or others.

10. Continued to be sensitive to the wrongs others had committed against me, and learned to quickly and immediately shift the blame for my parasitic lifestyle to others.

11. Through the fear and agitation of withdrawal, I was driven to seek greater conscience contact with the drug of my choice, desperately searching for ways to obey the dictates of my addiction, and for the power to carry that out.

12. Having developed a complete spiritual bankruptcy in my life as a result of these steps, I tried to initiate others into this lifestyle so I could have someone to exploit, and surrendered to the practice of these self-destructive principles until the bitter end.

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Responses

  1. I found this intensely insightful in terms of how addiction and recovery are interrelated in my own active addiction and recovery. Recovery, to me, is changing Higher Powers from life-destroying drugs of choice (in my case food and toxic love relationships) to a life-affirming alternative.

    I appreciate very much the alternative 12 Steps you have presented for the secular humanist–as well as the Santa-as-Higher-Power 12 Step list to point out how equally irrational it is to a non-theist to choose either God or Santa. I would more readily choose the Coca-Cola conceived Santa over God as a Higher Power, were it not for reality and reason being an option. However, because reality has no discrete will? Your collection of secular 12 Steps lists is greatly appreciated.

  2. 1. I decided that it’s OK to get high and everyone does it. 2. I came to believe that drugs are the greatest power there is, yet that I could control them. 3. I made an unconscious decision to turn my will and my life over to drugs as I could find them. 4. Made a search of ways to get drugs. 5. Rationalized giving up other interests and goals for the sake of staying high. 6. Became willing to give up on staying high as long as I could maintain anyway. 7. Humbly begged my connection to give me a break. 8. Made a list of all people who might interfere with my supply. 9. Avoided all such people except when to do so was impossible, and learned to deflect the subject of addiction until they left me alone. 10. Continued to try to get high again, knowing that it was driving up my tolerance but missing it too much to think straight. 11. Told myself I would take a tolerance break sometime later when I had no problems to deal with, and that I wasn’t as bad off as some people. 12. Carried this mess to others by glorifying my lifestyle out of defensiveness and wishful thinking.
    How’s that for steps to addiction?


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